Bordom from repetition in 3…2…1…

I don’t know if it’s my short attention span, or the fact that I was blessed with very little patience, but I find myself three quarters of the way done with a project, getting down to the finishing bits, and I find myself becoming frustrated and even a little bored completing the pieces that just a couple of days before made me very happy.

I’ve streamlined my process with the clay pieces that I’m working on now, but a single piece from start to finish still takes about five days to complete with curing times included. Multiple layers of glue and sealant. Which is why I make them in huge batches, like these guys:

firstowliebatchaug

and these guys:

firstpendantbatchaug

Needless to say, by day four or so, I’m ready to start on the next project. I guess I just need to figure out a way to stay excited through the “boring” part of the process. That and take a break when I get the “1000 yard stare”:

pendantslongview

 

 

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Adventures in Silver

From the time I can remember, silver has been a big part of my life. I’m not talking money, I’m talking jewelry. My mother was very fond of silver and turquoise jewelry. Actually silver set with any blue stone, green stone, coral, or any combination there of. I always liked the organic designs that were incorporated into her rings.

I was about ten years old when I decided to help my Mom and clean one of her rings that I thought was dirty. Little did I know that the darkened areas in the veins of the leaves and around the embellishments were supposed to be there. Well, whatever I used to “clean” her ring, cleaned it alright. It also destroyed the coral set in the ring! I was devastated. My Mom thought, I don’t know what my Mom thought at the time. She just hugged me, told me it was ok, that she’d find another rock to put into her ring. She also explained about patina. That the black added to the beauty of the silver and gave it depth.

After that I was hooked! I wanted to make silver jewelry. Being a ten year old, silversmithing was out of my reach just then.

Fast forward thirt…..*cough*….years and I was given the opportunity to take a silver smithing class! WOOT! I jumped on it!

It’s a really basic 4 week class that teaches me the techniques for making a pendant that I can apply to any piece I’d like to make. I can use what I learn here to add to my PMC (precious metal clay) projects.

Having never done anything like this before, not to mention never used anything more complicated than a kitchen torch, this was exciting!

Here was my work station at my Lapidary Club silversmithing room:

mywkspcatclub

A few of the  cool things about the Lapidary Club I belong too is that not only do they give classes that are less expensive than the colleges and the rec centers I’m close to, but I can use all of their equipment! Torches, cabbing machines, rock saws, faceting machines, casting equipment, kilns, you name it. As of this post, I’m comfortable with using the torch, I can grind me a pretty good cabochon:

cabmachine grindingrock1

and I can saw rocks like nobody’s business.

The instructor, a really cool dude named John Poole, is really patient. I like his teaching style. He shows you what he does, then lets you do it. If you screw it up, he shows you again with maybe a couple of helpful suggestions, then expects you to do it again. I tend to learn best that way.

First, I practiced on copper:

puckedpracticebezelcopperpracticebezel1  practicecopperbezel2

The first two I screwed up spectacularly! The third one was pretty good.

On to silver! First try at the bezel…well:

meltedbezel1 meltedbezel2

not so much. Melted it right good. One more try:

goodbezel

WOOT! Now for the wire I twisted:

greatbezel2 greatsilverbezel1

Yay!

Now realize that I’m three classes in and I have one more to go. These photos were over the course of three classes. Can’t wait to post the finished piece. My Mom would be proud!

 

 

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Never trust a skinny chef.

I always thought this phrase made sense even though it is a bit obnoxious. Personally I feel that the same could be said for an artist’s or crafter’s workspace. I find that even though I seem to work better in a state of organized chaos, it does get out of hand occasionally. See below:

chaoticspace

I’ve been working on about ten or so various pieces for the last month. When I say pieces, a few of them have more than one component that needs to be made, covered, sealed, painted, polished at any given time. In addition to that, there are drying times and curing times. Finding the space and the flow is sometimes difficult. Hence the photo above. I’m not even going to subject you to the photo of the other half of the room….it’s sad.

I came to a point yesterday when I just kind of fell apart. I couldn’t tell where I had started or what needed to be done next. I felt like I had lost all forward momentum and was just treading water. Couple that with not getting enough sleep for the last several days, and becoming a little depressed…….Not a good place to create in.

So this morning I woke up, got my coffee, and decided to tear shit up before I had my silversmithing class this afternoon. Here’s what I ended up with:

unfuckedstudio

I have discovered that now I am jazzed again to get in here and make beautiful things. (Along with finishing the pieces that I’ve got going) How long can I keep it a workable space? I don’t know. We’ll see.

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